Urban Insight

Urban Move

Citizens of Europe need to move around – to be mobile – to live their daily lives. Going to work, shopping for groceries, working out at the gym, supplying goods and products, removing waste products – all of this requires moving from point A to point B. Countless movements are done every day, putting pressure on cities, citizens and the environment and influencing the way we structure urban areas. Urban Insight 2018 illuminates various aspects of mobility and accessibility to enhance our understanding of different social and physical structures. We explore how citizens view and use urban areas and how local circumstances can be improved to create more liveable, sustainable and mobile cities and communities.

For motorised transport in Europe, motor traffic accounts for an average of 80% of passenger-kilometres travelled. The remaining 20% is travelled by public transport. The largest share of public transport passenger-kilometres in Europe is carried out by buses.
Approximately 212,000 electric cars were sold in Europe in 2016. Norway was the country with the most sales (with chargeable cars representing around 35% of new car sales), followed by the UK and France.
Copenhagen residents own 5.6 more bicycles than cars. In 2016 there were 675,000 bicycles in the city, as compared with 120,000 cars.
In 2001, 40% of Parisians did not own a car. In 2015 the corresponding figure was 60%.
People in Stockholm walk an average of 1 km per day. The corresponding distance in Brussels is 2.2 km.
The five most cycle-friendly cities in the world are located in Europe: Copenhagen (DK), Utrecht (NL), Amsterdam (NL), Strasbourg (FR) and Malmö (SE).
For motorised transport in Europe, motor traffic accounts for an average of 80% of passenger-kilometres travelled. The remaining 20% is travelled by public transport. The largest share of public transport passenger-kilometres in Europe is carried out by buses.
Approximately 212,000 electric cars were sold in Europe in 2016. Norway was the country with the most sales (with chargeable cars representing around 35% of new car sales), followed by the UK and France.

Urban Mobility on a Human Scale - Promoting and Facilitating Active Travel in Cities

The potential of bicycle and pedestrian travel in cities has been underestimated in past decades, resulting in deterioration of facilities and infrastructure. We are now seeing a revival of these active modes of transportation as more people recognise the health and environmental benefits. The report "Urban Mobility on a Human Scale – Promoting and Facilitating Active Travel in Cities" discusses ways in which walking and cycling can be further promoted and facilitated in our cities.

Contact

Lars Torstensson
Chief Communication Officer Sweco Grouplars.torstensson@sweco.se+46 702734879
Clare Day
Project Manager Sweco UKclare.day@sweco.co.uk
Bartosz Dowojna
Project Manager Sweco Polandbartosz.dowojna@sweco.pl+48 532859220
Stephan Landau
Project Manager Sweco Germanystephan.landau@sweco-gmbh.de+49 4212032764
Fieke van Leest
Project Manager Sweco NetherlandsFieke.vanleest@sweco.nl+31 651255764
Mikael af Ekenstam
Project Manager Sweco Norwaymikael.af.ekenstam@sweco.no+47 90630082
Saara Surla
Project Manager Sweco Finlandsaara.suurla@sweco.fi+358 40 7417677
Camilla Jo Luiting
Project Manager Sweco Denmarkcamillajo.luiting@sweco.dk
Guy Bourdet
Project Manager Sweco Belgiumguy.bourdet@swecobelgium.be